You are here: Home - Mortgages - First Time Buyer - News -

Divorcing couples opt to keep the family home

0
Written by: christinahoghton
19/04/2016
‘Bird's nest’ custody is taking off in the UK, as couples who split up choose to keep the children in the family home.

A new shared custody arrangement dubbed ‘bird’s nest custody’ is becoming more popular in the UK, according to new research from Co-op Legal Services.

It said that over a tenth (11%) of the UK’s separated and divorced adults haven’t followed ‘traditional’ child custody arrangements. Instead, they allowed their children to remain in their family home and they moved in and out of the house.

And over two-thirds of those separating agree that this new ‘bird’s nest’ child custody arrangement will become more common, as it causes less disruption to the lives of their children.

More than a fifth (16%) of divorced and separated adults said if they had the chance again, they would put such an agreement in place, with half (52%) admitting that keeping their children in the family home would have caused less upset and upheaval.

Bird’s nest custody benefits

A third (34%) agreed it would have been beneficial for their children to have stayed close to their friends and a further third (31%) said this would have made the divorce transition easier.

Almost a fifth (18%) said they wouldn’t have had to sell their house at a time where the housing market was weak.

And surprisingly, over half (51%) of UK’s divorced adults said that they would be willing to accept their ex’s new partner in their marital home.

Tracey Moloney, head of private family at Co-op Legal Services, said: “Traditionally, where couples separate and have shared custody of their children, the marital home is sold and both parents each purchase or rent a new property. The children are then expected to move between both properties depending on whether they are at ‘mum’s’ or ‘dad’s’.

“What we’re starting to see is a new custody arrangement emerging where instead of disrupting the children’s home life, the parents do the moving.

“Moving from one parent’s property to another can be difficult for children. With this new custody arrangement, parents move in and out of the marital home depending on when they have custody of their children.”

There are 0 Comment(s)

If you wish to comment without signing in, click your cursor in the top box and tick the 'Sign in as a guest' box at the bottom.

The savings accounts paying the most interest

If one of your jobs this month is to get your finances in order, moving your savings to a higher paying deal i...

Everything you need to know about being furloughed

Few people had heard of ‘furlough’ before March 2020, but the coronavirus pandemic thrust the idea of bein...

Coronavirus and your finances: what help can you get in the second lockdown?

News and updates on everything to do with coronavirus and your personal finances.

What will happen if rates change

How your finances will be impacted by a rise in interest rates.

Regular Savings Calculator

Small regular contributions can build up nicely over time.

Online Savings Calculator

Work out how your online savings can build over time.

Having a baby and your finances: seven top tips

We’re guessing the Duchess of Cambridge won’t be fretting about maternity pay or whether she’ll still be...

Protecting family wealth: 10 tips for cutting inheritance tax

Inheritance tax - sometimes known as 'death tax' - can cause even more heartache for bereaved families. But th...

Travel insurance: Five tips to ensure a successful claim

Ahead of your summer holiday, it’s important to make sure you have the right level of travel cover or you co...

Money Tips of the Week

  • @YourMoneyUK I will be travelling to UK from Gran Canaria and im in reciept of pension credit, am i eligible for this payment?
  • Unclaimed money scheme expanded to aid Covid recovery: https://t.co/lQgBdlQJE0 @YourMoneyUK
  • RT @thenutmegteam: Keeping on top of your pension now could well pay dividends in the future. ⏳ Nutmeg's savings and investments specialis…

Read previous post:
Know an ‘uncrystallised pension’ from a ‘drawdown’? Pension jargon steered towards scrapheap

Pension jargon such as ‘uncrystallised pension funds lump sum’ and ‘flexi-access drawdown’ could be scrapped in a bid to make...

Close