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March Premium Bonds: have you won a life-changing sum?

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02/03/2020
A woman from Norwich and a man from Cambridgeshire have become the latest winners of the £1m Premium Bonds jackpot.

The lucky woman from Norwich invested the maximum £50,000 and bought the winning NS&I Premium Bond in July 2015. The winning bond number is 250KD320334.

She is just the third jackpot winner from the East Anglian city.

The second big winner is a man from Cambridgeshire who scooped the life-changing £1m prize after investing £15,700 in July 2018. The winning bond number is 334AX125846 and came from a previous £25 win which was reinvested rather than banked.

The jackpot win makes the man the fourth jackpot millionaire from the area.

There were 3.5 million prizes up for grabs in the March draw, worth £100.5m. This is the highest prize fund since December 2007 when it reached £119.7m.

There were 86 billion eligible bonds for the draw. Since the first draw in June 1957, 473 million prizes have been drawn with a total value of £20.4bn.

Unclaimed prizes

According to NS&I – the government’s savings arm – there are more than 1.7 million unclaimed winning Bonds worth £65m.

Premium Bonds may go unclaimed for reasons including if NS&I doesn’t hold your current address details or if you had bonds bought as a child but have since forgotten about them.

Customers can make sure their details are up-to-date and choose to have any future prizes paid directly into their bank account, by registering to manage their Premium Bonds online at nsandi.com/register.

Bond holders can also check whether they’ve won by visiting www.nsandi.com, or through its prize checker app available on iOS and Android, and through Alexa-enabled devices.

Jill Waters, NS&I’s retail director, said: “Spring is well and truly here for these two jackpot millionaires, as well as more than three million other people who have received tax-free prizes this month.

“Our millionaire from Cambridgeshire won with a Bond that was worth just £25 following a reinvestment from a previous prize win they’d had. With £25 being the minimum amount that people can invest, this shows that any holding, whether small or large, has a chance to win the magic £1m jackpot.

“The £25 minimum investment is just one of the ways that Premium Bonds have become more accessible. We’ve recently launched text message notifications to inform people of wins, as well as enabling child winners to have their prizes paid directly into the bank account of their nominated responsible parent or guardian, ensuring that children get their prizes more quickly.”

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