You are here: Home - Household Bills - News -

Half of UK workers hiding mental health problems from colleagues 

0
Written by:
04/08/2021
Workers are feeling pressurised to hide their mental health problems from their colleagues despite feeling like they’re not coping at work, new research reveals.

Just over half (51 per cent) of people surveyed said they felt under pressure to put on a brave face in front of their co-workers, while a quarter are worried about having to be the best version of themselves when they return to the workplace, after lockdown restrictions were lifted.

The government has been urging businesses to ramp up a return to offices over the summer, with chancellor Rishi Sunak telling Linkedin News this week it was “really beneficial” to be in an office at the start of his career.

However, the survey of 2,000 people on behalf of Lime Insurance, revealed people are struggling.

Just over a quarter (26 per cent) of respondents said they didn’t think they were coping at work, and over a third (34 per cent) felt the same way about everyday life.

Four in 10 (40 per cent) said they felt less resilient now than they did before the pandemic.

Only 16 per cent of respondents felt their mental health was very well supported at work, despite 81 per cent wanting their employers to support their mental wellbeing.

Some 42 per cent said they expected their employer to do more – and 40 per cent even admitted that they would look for a new job if their employer didn’t do so.

Shaun Williams, chief executive and founder of Lime Global, said: The past 18 months has had a huge impact on people’s lives, including on their mental health and resilience. The long-term repercussions of the pandemic are likely to be felt for years to come, and it’s important we act now to be aware of and prioritise both our own mental health and that of those around us.”

Young people are bearing the brunt of these challenges, with 43 per cent of women and 49 per cent of young men aged 16-24 feeling less resilient now than they did before the pandemic.

In addition, 56 per cent of women feel like they have to put on a brave face for their colleagues – compared to 45 per cent of men.

There are 0 Comment(s)

If you wish to comment without signing in, click your cursor in the top box and tick the 'Sign in as a guest' box at the bottom.

The savings accounts paying the most interest

It’s time to get your finances in shape, and moving your cash savings to a higher paying deal is a good plac...

Everything you need to know about being furloughed

Few people had heard of ‘furlough’ before March 2020, but the coronavirus pandemic thrust the idea of bein...

The experts’ guide to sorting out your personal finances in 2021

From opting to ‘low spend’ months to imposing your own ‘cooling-off period’, industry experts reveal t...

What will happen if rates change

How your finances will be impacted by a rise in interest rates.

Regular Savings Calculator

Small regular contributions can build up nicely over time.

Online Savings Calculator

Work out how your online savings can build over time.

Having a baby and your finances: seven top tips

We’re guessing the Duchess of Cambridge won’t be fretting about maternity pay or whether she’ll still be...

Protecting family wealth: 10 tips for cutting inheritance tax

Inheritance tax - sometimes known as 'death tax' - can cause even more heartache for bereaved families. But th...

Travel insurance: Five tips to ensure a successful claim

Ahead of your summer holiday, it’s important to make sure you have the right level of travel cover or you co...

Money Tips of the Week