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How to avoid a Christmas insurance claim

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Written by: Simon Hird
11/12/2018
It may be the most wonderful time of the year, but with all the excitement leading up to Christmas, it’s easy to get carried away with the festive cheer and forget about protecting your valuables and home.

The good news? Taking just a few small steps can make a huge difference in keeping your property, possessions and most importantly, yourself, safe over the festive period. Doing so will give you the peace of mind and security you need to focus on the festivities, rather than worrying about things going wrong.

We’ve put together a list of top tips to keep your home and belongings protected over the holiday season:

    • Be sure to activate your alarm and leave a light on if you’re going out to celebrate over the festive period.
    • Have a family member or trusted neighbour check on your property if you’ll be away over Christmas, adjusting lights and curtains, parking on the driveway and clearing any post that accumulates.
    • Don’t leave burning candles unattended and make sure to keep decorations and cards away from fires and other heat sources.
    • Think about what you post on social media. As tempting as it is to show your friends what gifts Father Christmas brought you, think carefully about who will be able to read your posts, and check your privacy settings.
    • Make sure your Christmas presents are out of sight by storing them away from any windows or glass-panelled doors.
    • If you’re out shopping in your car, lock any purchases in the boot, with the parcel shelf covering them.
    • Don’t overload electricity sockets with fairy lights, decorations, or too many household goods.
    • Be careful not to over decorate the Christmas tree. Fairy lights can be a fire risk, so consider buying new ones to ensure they have a high standard of safety and be sure to turn them off when unattended and don’t leave them on overnight.
    • Check that your new presents will be covered by your insurance policy. The limit for single items typically ranges from £1,500 to £2,500, so be sure to double check with your insurer if you’ve bought anything above this.
    • Make sure your insurance policy covers accidental damage for any breakages to new items or any wine spillages during the festive season.
    • Lastly, clear a big enough path for Father Christmas to get down the chimney – you don’t want anything to get broken en route!

Simon Hird is head of broker & intermediary at Legal & General General Insurance

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