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Two-year fixed mortgage rate sees highest rise in eight years

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Written by: YourMoney.com
06/11/2017
The average two-year fixed mortgage rate has seen a 0.12% rise between October and November - the highest monthly raise in eight years.

From its historic low of 2.21% in October, data site Moneyfacts revealed the average two-year fixed mortgage rate has risen by a considerable 0.12%, to 2.33% — representing the biggest monthly increase since August 2009.

Charlotte Nelson, finance expert at Moneyfacts, said: “Since the start of October, 49% of lenders have increased their rates in some shape or form, with providers preparing for a base rate rise that was seen as a sure thing. The recent base rate rise is likely to add fuel to the fire and cause rates to rise particularly in the variable rate market.”

The data was drawn from the Moneyfacts UK Mortgage Trends Treasury Report and comes in the wake of a 0.25% base rate rise to 0.5% this November, which was expected to trigger a wave of reactionary increases in mortgage rates.

However, Nelson noted that the size of the increase has essentially wiped out any rate cuts that have occurred in the last six months.

“The speculation surrounding the announcement on 2 November saw interest Swap rates rise significantly, with providers having little choice but to factor this into their pricing,” she said.

“Following the two and five-year Swap rates going up by similar amounts, the average five-year fixed mortgage rate has increased in the same dramatic fashion, having risen by 0.12% from 2.76% in October to stand at 2.88% today.”

The average two-year fixed mortgage rate dropped from 2.34% in November 2016 to 2.30% in May this year, which was slashed again to 2.21% by this October. The average rate is now sitting just below that of November 2016.

“With rates on the rise even before base rate rose, borrowers should use this as a catalyst to sort out their mortgage,” Nelson said, adding: “any borrower sitting on their standard variable rate or coming to the end of a deal should remortgage as soon as possible to avoid disappointment in a market where rates are rising.”

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